Periodic Table with Atomic Mass

The periodic Table with atomic mass stands as a foundational cornerstone in the field of chemistry, presenting a systematic structure for organizing and comprehending the fundamental constituents of matter. This table arranges elements by their atomic numbers, which denote the number of protons within their nuclei. This systematic arrangement reveals recurring patterns, grouping elements with similar chemical properties into columns or groups. By integrating information on atomic masses, this table emerges as a potent information, enhancing our understanding of element composition and behavior and underscoring its pivotal role in delving into the multifaceted realm of chemistry.

Periodic Table with Atomic Mass
Periodic Table with Atomic Mass

The atomic mass of an element is defined as the total mass of a single atom of that specific element and is measured in unified atomic mass units (u). One unified atomic mass unit is equivalent to the mass of one-twelfth of a carbon-12 atom at rest. Given that protons and neutrons contribute significantly to the atom’s mass, the atomic mass of an element is nearly identical to its mass number. Therefore, the atomic mass is determined using unified atomic mass units and reflects the combined mass of protons and neutrons in an atom.

Indeed, elements with atomic numbers greater than 104 fall into the category of superheavy elements. As the atomic number increases, indicating more protons in the nucleus, the size of the nucleus grows, leading to increased instability in general. The larger the nucleus, the more challenging it becomes for the strong nuclear force to counteract the repulsive forces between positively charged protons.

This increased instability often results in shorter half-lives for the isotopes of superheavy elements, making them difficult to study and observe for an extended period. Researchers face considerable challenges in synthesizing and studying these elements due to their fleeting existence and the complex nuclear reactions involved in their creation. The study of superheavy elements contributes valuable insights into nuclear physics and the limits of stability within the periodic table.

Elements in Periodic Table with Atomic Mass

ElementAtomic NumberSymbolAtomic Mass
Hydrogen1H1.008
Helium2He4.0026
Lithium3Li6.94
Beryllium4Be9.0122
Boron5B10.81
Carbon6C12.011
Nitrogen7N14.007
Oxygen8O15.999
Fluorine9F18.998
Neon10Ne20.180
Sodium11Na22.990
Magnesium12Mg24.305
Aluminum13Al26.982
Silicon14Si28.085
Phosphorus15P30.974
Sulfur16S32.06
Chlorine17Cl35.45
Argon18Ar39.948
Potassium19K39.098
Calcium20Ca40.078
Scandium21Sc44.956
Titanium22Ti47.867
Vanadium23V50.942
Chromium24Cr51.996
Manganese25Mn54.938
Iron26Fe55.845
Cobalt27Co58.933
Nickel28Ni58.693
Copper29Cu63.546
Zinc30Zn65.38
Gallium31Ga69.723
Germanium32Ge72.63
Arsenic33As74.922
Selenium34Se78.971
Bromine35Br79.904
Krypton36Kr83.798
Rubidium37Rb85.468
Strontium38Sr87.62
Yttrium39Y88.906
Zirconium40Zr91.224
Niobium41Nb92.906
Molybdenum42Mo95.95
Technetium43Tc(98)
Ruthenium44Ru101.07
Rhodium45Rh102.906
Palladium46Pd106.42
Silver47Ag107.868
Cadmium48Cd112.414
Indium49In114.818
Tin50Sn118.710
Antimony51Sb121.760
Tellurium52Te127.60
Iodine53I126.904
Xenon54Xe131.294
Cesium55Cs132.906
Barium56Ba137.327
Lanthanum57La138.906
Cerium58Ce140.116
Praseodymium59Pr140.907
Neodymium60Nd144.242
Promethium61Pm(145)
Samarium62Sm150.36
Europium63Eu151.964
Gadolinium64Gd157.25
Terbium65Tb158.925
Dysprosium66Dy162.500
Holmium67Ho164.930
Erbium68Er167.259
Thulium69Tm168.934
Ytterbium70Yb173.045
Lutetium71Lu174.967
Hafnium72Hf178.49
Tantalum73Ta180.948
Tungsten74W183.84
Rhenium75Re186.207
Osmium76Os190.23
Iridium77Ir192.217
Platinum78Pt195.084
Gold79Au196.967
Mercury80Hg200.592
Thallium81Tl204.383
Lead82Pb207.2
Bismuth83Bi208.980
Polonium84Po(209)
Astatine85At(210)
Radon86Rn(222)
Francium87Fr(223)
Radium88Ra(226)
Actinium89Ac(227)
Thorium90Th232.038
Protactinium91Pa231.036
Uranium92U238.029
Neptunium93Np(237)
Plutonium94Pu(244)
Americium95Am(243)
Curium96Cm(247)
Berkelium97Bk(247)
Californium98Cf(251)
Einsteinium99Es(252)
Fermium100Fm(257)
Mendelevium101Md(258)
Nobelium102No(259)
Lawrencium103Lr(262)
Rutherfordium104Rf(263)
Dubnium105Db(268)
Seaborgium106Sg(271)
Bohrium107Bh(270)
Hassium108Hs(270)
Meitnerium109Mt(278)
Darmstadtium110Ds(281)
Roentgenium111Rg(281)
Copernicium112Cn(285)
Nihonium113Nh(286)
Flerovium114Fl(289)
Moscovium115Mc(289)
Livermorium116Lv(293)
Tennessine117Ts(294)
Oganesson118Og(294)

Since there is no “natural” abundance for lab-created trans-uranium elements, atomic mass for elements 93-118 listed on the periodic table is the longest-lived isotope.

Los Alamos National Laboratory

References

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Jyoti Bashyal

Jyoti Bashyal, a graduate of the Central Department of Chemistry, is an avid explorer of the molecular realm. Fueled by her fascination with chemical reactions and natural compounds, she navigates her field's complexities with precision and passion. Outside the lab, Jyoti is dedicated to making science accessible to all. She aspires to deepen audiences' understanding of the wonders of various scientific subjects and their impact on the world by sharing them with a wide range of readers through her writing.

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